Living Roots Ecovillage, nestled amidst the corn, soybean and beef farms of southern Indiana, stands out. It's a place that draws people from around the country to learn how live a life of responsible and sustainable farming in an era when that isn't the norm. The Ecovillage, which sustains itself by selling organic produce and meat at farmers markets and restaurants as well as through Community Supported Agriculture, is more than just a farm. The apprentices, who stay anywhere from a week to years, become a family who take care of each other and the earth.

Saddled with a harvesting bag, Rae Hillen of Greensboro, N.C., picks green beans for market before dinner on July 24, 2015 at Living Roots Ecovillage in French Lick, Ind.. Rae, a summer apprentice at the farm, has an affinity for herbs and plans to go to school to learn more about their use. Located amidst a sea of large corn and soybean farms in Indiana, the Ecovillage in unique in focusing on raising food and animals sustainably. 

Assistant farm manager Chris Jarrett of Raleigh, N.C., left, and apprentice Sam Stone of Richmond pick zucchini for market on August 28.

Farm apprentices Nick Sednek of Bailey, Colo., holds Rae Hillen of Greensboro, N.C., as they joke around while they and Ecovillage resident Helen Bass of Conway, Ark., left, and farm apprentices Emily Spatt of Fort Wayne and Emily MacGibeny of New London, Conn. help load the truck on July 24 for the next day's farmers market.

Ali Mitchell of Bedford, the farm's animal leader, pets Shoka, one of the farm's turkeys, after she fed Shoka and the chickens some squash on Aug. 12. Pigs, cattle, turkeys and chickens are all raised at the Ecovillage.

In preparation for the next day's farmers market, farm apprentice Emily MacGibeny of New London, Conn. picks through garlic that is curing outside the barn on July 24. Emily, who is a student at Connecticut College, spent last summer teaching about food and cooking and preparing and serving locally-sourced meals to residents of East Portland, Ore. 

Farm apprentices Mecie Delffs of Grand Rapids, Mich., left, Rae Hillen of Greensboro, N.C., top, and Emily MacGibeny of New London, Conn., stretch after morning yoga at the Ecovillage on August 12. Every Wednesday the day starts off with an optional hour of yoga before harvesting and chores begin.

Shelbi Brunner of Richmond arranges her trinkets on a crate used for a nightstand while moving into the Ecovillage on Sept. 11. Brunner didn't stay at the Ecovillage long, a few weeks, before deciding that living and working at the farm wasn't for her.

Farm apprentice Nick Sednek of Bailey, Colo., left, assistant farm manager Chris Jarrett of Raleigh, N.C., apprentice Mecie Delffs of Grand Rapids, Mich. and Ecovillage resident Helen Bass of Conway, Ark., watch the sunset from a neighboring property after dinner on July 24. Delffs was trying to convince the three to look at the sunset upside down. 

Apprentices and residents soak in the sunset from a neighboring property after a long day of harvesting on July 24. People come to the Ecovillage for different reasons- some come to learn about sustainable agriculture, others to reconnect with the earth, and still others to get away from jobs or a life that felt unfulfilling.